Jennifer Astle

March 14, 2009

Weekend Reading: Women in the Media

20090119-091203-pic-605449109_011In honor of Women’s History Month, weekend reading is focused on women in the media.  The media, I would argue, is one of the last great vestiges of The Patriarchy.  This is evident in journalism, the television and film industries, and the literary world.  Allow me to demonstrate.

What is the next logical step for a woman in politics after a long, challenging election?  Why, be immortalized in a comic, of course!  Bluewater Productions brings us Sarah “Super Power” Palin and Adventures in Abstinence.  Okay, not really, but they are in second print of their Palin-themed comic.

Speaking of people who worship the cult of Palin, Ann Coulter’s new book; Guilty; Another Book Blaming Liberals for Everything, is struggling in sales.  I can’t imagine why.

Jennifer Weiner talks about a lecture featuring Ann Patchett and Elizabeth Gilbert, where the two apparently spent more time at the spa doing yoga than at the podium waxing literary.  The article is titled “Why Can’t a Woman (Writer) Be More Like a Man?”  Your parenthesis don’t fool me!  Gilbert is the author of Eat, Pray, Love.  Weiner adds “If you’ve read Gilbert’s work (and by now, who hasn’t?), then you know that her confiding, urgent tone is precisely what so many women found irresistible.”  Raises hand…I haven’t, and I don’t.

Of course, we all know that those ladies were off doing yoga, because a woman can’t possibly be successful in the media if she doesn’t conform to all known stereotypes about what defines women as attractive, right?  Two people suited to discuss this issue are Rachel Maddow and Meghan McCain. 

Maddow was recently asked about her “dyke-stache” in an interview with Vanity Fair’s George Wayne. Here’s a taste.

W: By the way, before your Peacock Network makeover, didn’t you have a dyke-stache?

M: A what?

W: Facial hair over your lip—a dyke-stache.

M: I never had any facial hair in my life.

It gets even better when he asks her if she enjoys eproctophilia.

Last, but not the least, Meghan McCain (who post-election is now a writer for The Daily Beast) is being criticised by Laura Ingraham, not for her writing skills, but her weight.

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2 Comments »

  1. I understand the sentiment, but then perhaps the critic thinks her writing’s fine but she’s overweight. If that’s what the critic thinks then that’s what she thinks, so it’s a fair point. It may not be important in a literary sense, but, hey… why not criticise her for something at least?

    Comment by CJ — March 14, 2009 @ 6:54 pm

  2. Sure, but let me ask you this….when was the last time you heard a man call out a male writer saying he’s fat and the only reason anyone likes him is because of his dad?

    Comment by jenniferastle — March 15, 2009 @ 2:38 pm


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